Banks - How Many Do You Use?




Hi folks

No, I'm not talking about banks for your cash - I'm talking about other banks.

We are so used to the word "bank" referring to just cash money, that it is easy to forget that one of the core values of the simple living/frugality community is everything other than banks for our cash.

We really need to be encouraging each other to be building these other banks right inside our homes and families - it is too easy to get side tracked.




So, what other banks are we referring to here?

Other Banks

  •   A bank of food - our stockpile
  •   A bank of knowledge - our home journals or practical grimoires
  •   A bank of seeds - do you seed save?
  •   A bank of fire wood
  •   A bank of community contacts - bartering, knowledge sharing, community gardening etc.
  •   A bank of skills - preserving, soap making, cooking from scratch, growing food, mechanics, woodwork, building, fermenting, herbalism etc.
  •   A bank of books - either yours or your local library
  •   A bank of power alternatives - batteries, kero, solar



We probably need to stop thinking of banks just in terms of cash, because as the above list testifies, banking should happen pretty much in every part of our lives.

What other banks do you all have I wonder?


Take care folks - stay nice

Mr HM

Comments

  1. I've never thought about these things as banks but I guess they are! I have an emergency fund (that I am still putting deposits in whenever I can), a small stockpile of staples and regularly used grocery items (from which I make withdrawals from time to time), a small collection of cookery books and gardening books and magazines like my favourite, Grass Roots. I regularly access the knowledge and ideas and projects in those! We do have solar panels and we have water tanks ... I'm thinking a reliable supply of water in our climate is pretty important! We have wonderful neighbours who are friendly and look out for each other so I think that too is like a community bank! Meg:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh - Grassroots. I can remember reading my first Grassroots magazine at age 12 - hooked instantly. I must ask my old parents what they did with all their collection of GR magazines.

      Delete
  2. I have a lovely bank of fabric and sewing materials?....Though I'm not sure that counts. LOL

    Soon, when we move we will need to have a larger stockpile of goods at home. Including a couple of spare gas bottles. There is nothing worse then being in the shower with a head full of shampoo and the gas running out.

    xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think a stash of fabric and sewing things do count, Emma! Meg:)

      Delete
    2. Material stash is most certainly one of your banks.

      Delete
  3. I have a little in each of the above categories, which is good to know, because it provides a list of things I can be grateful for.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True. I am thinking of adding water tanks at our new place, that will be another bank too.

      Delete
  4. Trying to catch up on my "bank" of favourite blogs ;)

    I am having a real hiatus from blogging at the moment. Although I have so much to blog about, my mojo has left the building. Oh well, usually when I start reading my favourites again it is enough to motivate me to do another post.

    I have a stockpile of too much stuff! I don't think I could be a minimalist, even though the thought of being one is attractive. I was reared in a family of hoarders, never throwing anything that was useful out lol!

    My other banks are similar to yours; food and necessities (I buy lots when they on special). These days all our meals are plant based (vegan), so definitely a money saver there and good for our health too. Like Emma, I have a fabric/craft stash, not necessarily all put to good use though. I am about to make produce bags out of old curtains, so that's a start right?

    I have lots of knowledge sitting on my bookshelf, a bank of batteries for our solar system, a cupboard full of preserves, a pile of firewood in the woodshed :)

    Hope you are keeping fit and well.

    I will be back to read more a bit later today.

    xTania

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hear what you are saying about minimalism, I'm not sure it is an exact fit for me either.

      Delete
    2. Tania, I am feeling somewhat the same regarding blogging at the moment. I still like the idea of blogging but my motivation seems to be taking a holiday.

      Delete
  5. My bank is full of items on special offer, it includes, tea, coffee, loo rolls, kitchen towel, dishwasher tablets, these items we bulk buy when they are on special and store. In most cases we keep enough so we never have to pay full price.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah - I love my stockpile of food and housekeeping items bought on special too. I am thinking of adding some bees to our garden, then I'll have an investment bank of honey. I am currently checking out the council rules on bees

      Delete
    2. Hi Phil, a little while back Catalyst (ABC) were looking for people in your area to raise bees. Might be worth looking into. :)
      Eden

      Delete
  6. I have several working sewing machines, including a treadle. I have more sewing needles and threads than I can ever use. My one good item in my sewing bank is the ability to draft patterns. I am a master at sewing, drafting patterns, mending the unmendable. I can rescue anything. I have a wonderful stockpile of fabric, some of which could be cut for tp.

    Other banks include chicken knowledge and supplies. I have a bit of all the other banks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow Linda, I know of only 2 other people who can draft a pattern from scratch, one of them being my very old mother. That is a unique skill, so rare now.

      Delete
  7. I see what you mean, yes all of the above are investments.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is so true. We can easily become our own small conglomerate of wealth, given some thought.

      Delete
  8. this really gave me pause for thought (again) as I rarely have much food in the house...time to start putting some extras in the grocery cart for my "food bank"...my bank of sewing, quilting, rug hooking and stitching supplies is overflowing...my home library is always in need of another book or two...time to add to the skills bank too...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When times get tough again (as they will as things go in cycles) having a stockpile of skills and materials set aside will be invaluable. When others are scrabbling, you'll be sorted!

      Delete
  9. I have most of the above plus plenty of soap, bi-carb, the basics. We also have lots of bits and bobs in the shed which are useful for repairs, as well as things like old clothes that can be cut up and repurposed. My mother always bought good quality sheets, towels and underwear on sale so we never ran out and we saved money at the same time. And she really did save the money Phil - her super when she retired was huge for the 1980s and especially big for a woman at that time. In fact it was more than many would have retiring today. She was a nurse and a savvy saver :-) I am forever grateful that she instilled a fear of credit card debt in us!

    Madeleine

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of those original Superannuation plans were so generous - good on your mother for having the presence of mind and the intelligence to leverage it.

      Delete
  10. Hi Phil and a fantastic subject to blog about and hadn't really thought to use the word banks :) . We are Mormons so we are taught and counseled to store "every needful thing" for 3 months - 7 years depending on your financial, space and country laws.

    So here is our banks all usually purchased on special -
    - Firewood, smoker, fuel, gas, candles, lanterns, torches, flint fire starters,lighters & matches.
    - Medical supplies, medications, vitamins and minerals.
    - Hand and electrical tools, tapes, tarps, ocky straps, tents, camp beds & cooking equipment.
    - Clothing, shoes, underwear, socks, sheets, towels, tea towels, rags for cleaning.
    - Food, personal care products, spices, sauces, honey, homemade jams & cooking implements. We get 15 kg of honey from a friend we barter with for him using our land for keeping his hives on.
    - Garden seeds, fertilisers, metal and wooden garden stakes, gardening hand and petrol driven tools and equipment.
    - Books for knowledge.
    - Fabric, patterns, needles, thread and other related equipment.
    - Skills bank - jam making, cooking, gardening, seed saving, propagating plants from cuttings and separating plants for new ones, sewing, making my own patterns and designing items, decorating, mechanical and building knowledge, haggling on prices, home renovation skills, how to operate and use a chainsaw and lots of other mechanical equipment, how to dry herbs, how to blanch and freeze produce, medical & first aid knowledge (I was a nurse and DH is field trained military) & how to trade. We have set up a good network of friends we trade & barter with with varying skills.

    All I can think of at the moment.

    Sewingcreations15 (Lorna)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lorna - this is fabulous. A truly wise approach.

      Delete
  11. wow, i didn't think there were so many! this is awesome!
    i have a wool/yarn bank, a little stash of materials/fabrics for sewing, not that i can or do but you never know in a crisis! i can garden & i also save seeds (when i remember, otherwise they just go back into the garden) have a small food stockpile going; mostly jams & chutneys with lots of tinned beans, corn, lentils & fruit & a few others as well; am not good at baking so usually buy my bread, though recently got given a bread maker but haven't set it up yet, due to no bench space & need to learn how to make sourdough starter.
    found this post & comments very helpful as now i know i am fairly frugal with all my 'banks' too
    thanx for sharing

    ReplyDelete
  12. What a great concept. From your list, the only one I don't have is wood, because we don't use firewood (yet). I try to keep a small stash of cash hidden in out of the ordinary places, such as taped to back or underside of furniture, under a carpet, etc. In case of a power failure the atms will be unavailable.

    It is also handy to have some non-electric appliances and tools, such as a beater which can be used when the electric mixer cannot be used.

    ReplyDelete

Post a comment