Friday, 14 October 2016

Bread - Dough Hook Method PICTORIAL




Hi Folks

Do you have a mixing appliance with a dough hook? Then this bread making recipe and method is for you.

We have never had a machine with a dough hook before so we have always been relegated to either kneading by hand (phew) or using a bread maker (OK but....nah). Recently we managed to frugally acquire a KitchenAid (read about this here) which of course came with a dough hook. Naturally I got to trying out the said dough hook pretty smartly and I absolutely love it.

So here is a simple, yummy bread making recipe and method using a dough hook.

I combine the ingredients and the method together in this tutorial.  If you just want to see it in pictures, then jump straight past the writing and scroll down to the pictures now (that's what I would do  hee hee!). I have taken over 30 photos showing every single step.

  1. Set up your mixer with the dough hook attachment and bowl in place. You will be placing ingredients in by specific order straight into the bowl....so do not alter or mix up the next steps.
  2. Add 2 x teaspoons of  dried yeast (I keep mine in the freezer for best results)
  3. Add 1 x level tablespoon of soft brown sugar
  4. Add in 5 x tablespoons of very warm water (not hot or it will kill the yeast)
  5. Take a 5 minute break (make a cuppa or something) and allow the yeast to begin to activate before adding any other ingredients
  6.  Add in 3 1/2 x cups of plain flour
  7. Add in 3 x teaspoons of bread enhancer flour (I keep this in the freezer too)
  8. Add 3 x heaped dessert spoons of full cream milk powder
  9. Add 2 x level teaspoons of salt
  10. Add 1 x tablespoon of olive oil
  11. Add in 1 x teaspoon of corn flour starch
  12. Add in 250 mils of warm water. (Not hot water or it will kill the yeast)
  13. Lower dough hook and turn mixer onto lowest setting till all ingredients combined
  14. Turn up mixer to medium speed so that you can see the centrifugal force throwing the dough off the hook just a little. Your mixer will thump around a bit - that's OK.
  15. If the mix is too dry it will form a tight ball around the dough hook whilst mixing.  Conversely, if the mix is too wet it will stick copiously to the sides and bottom of the bowl whilst mixing. We are ideally looking for an elastic ball of dough that collects around the dough hook but is also mixing freely and slapping the sides of the bowl whilst mixing and leaving just a little trace of mixture on the bowl.  If the mix is too wet, add flour 1 x tablespoon at a time.  If the mix is too dry, add warm water 1 x tablespoon at a time.
  16. Once we are happy with the consistency of our mix from step 15, allow mixer to operate on medium for a further full 10 minutes undisturbed.
  17. Stop mixer, lift the hook and slide the dough off the hook into the bowl.
  18. Place 5 or 6 inches of very warm water into your kitchen sink (Not hot water, or it will damage the yeast and proofing of the dough)
  19. Place the bowl with the dough still in it into the warm water and cover with a tea towel.
  20. Leave till dough has doubled in size - this could take 1/2 hour or up to 2 hours depending on a zillion variables.
  21. Prepare your bread tin and line with a saved paper butter wrapper (buttery side up) or baking paper brushed with a tiny amount of oil.
  22. Once dough has doubled in size, place bowl back under the dough hook and mix on low for 1 x minute only.
  23. Flour your hands well
  24. Remove dough from dough hook and form into the shape needed for the baking tin.
  25. Put dough into lined baking tin smooth side up. (Now is the time to groove the dough with a very sharp knife if you want)
  26. Empty water from the kitchen sink and replace with fresh very warm water (only 2 or 3 inches this time) and place bread dough and tin into water and cover sink with a cloth. Make sure the cloth does not touch the dough.
  27. Turn oven onto 230 degrees Celsius.
  28. Allow dough to rise right up in the baking tin (usually 30 mins or certainly maybe much longer).  This is happening whilst your oven is heating up.
  29. Very gently remove baking tin with dough from the warm water and gently place into your very hot oven.
  30. Bake for the first 10 mins on very hot (230 degree Celsius) and then drop the heat to 190 degree Celsius continue to bake for a further 20 mins.
  31. Have a cooling tray ready to place the cooked bread on to cool. (Let it cool in the tin)
  32. Please allow hot bread to cool for 1 hour before cutting as the cooling process is vital for the bread to finish forming its flavour and texture.
  33. Turn out of the tin, carefully peel off the butter wrapper paper and ENJOY!


THE PICTURE VERSION



1. Set up your mixer with the dough hook attachment and bowl in place. You will be placing ingredients in by specific order straight into the bowl....so do not alter or mix up the next steps.

2. Add 2 x teaspoons of dried yeast (I keep mine in the freezer for best results)

  3. Add 1 x level tablespoon of soft brown sugar

  4. Add in 5 x tablespoons of very warm water (not hot or it will kill the yeast)


  5. Take a 5 minute break (make a cuppa or something).....


.... and allow the yeast to begin to activate before adding any other ingredients

  6.  Add in 3 1/2 x cups of plain flour

  7. Add in 3 x teaspoons of bread enhancer flour (I keep this in the freezer too)

  8. Add 3 x heaped dessert spoons of full cream milk powder

  9. Add 2 x level teaspoons of salt

  10. Add 1 x tablespoon of olive oil

11. Add in 1 x teaspoon of corn flour starch

  12. Add in 250 mils of warm water. (Not hot water or it will kill the yeast)

13. Lower dough hook ........

.....and turn mixer onto lowest setting till all ingredients combined

lowest setting

  14. Turn up mixer to medium speed so that you can see the centrifugal force throwing the dough off the hook just a little. 

Your mixer will thump around a bit - that's OK.

  15. If the mix is too dry it will form a tight ball around the dough hook whilst mixing.  Conversely, if the mix is too wet it will stick copiously to the sides and bottom of the bowl whilst mixing. We are ideally looking for an elastic ball of dough that collects around the dough hook but is also mixing freely and slapping the sides of the bowl whilst mixing and leaving just a little trace of mixture on the bowl.  If the mix is too wet, add flour 1 x tablespoon at a time.  If the mix is too dry, add warm water 1 x tablespoon at a time.

16. Once we are happy with the consistency of our mix from step 15, allow mixer to operate on medium for a further full 10 minutes undisturbed.

17. Stop mixer, lift the hook and slide the dough off the hook.......

...... into the bowl.


18. Place 5 or 6 inches of very warm water into your kitchen sink (Not hot water, or it will damage the yeast and proofing of the dough)

19. Place the bowl with the dough still in it into the warm water.....


....... and cover with a tea towel.


  20. Leave till dough has doubled in size - this could take 1/2 hour or up to 2 hours depending on a zillion variables.

21. Prepare your bread tin and line with a saved paper butter wrapper (buttery side up) or baking paper brushed with a tiny amount of oil.


  22. Once dough has doubled in size, place bowl back under the dough hook and mix on low for 1 x minute only.

  23. Flour your hands well

  24. Remove dough from dough hook and form into the shape needed for the baking tin.

  25. Put dough into lined baking tin smooth side up. 

(Now is the time to groove the dough with a very sharp knife if you want)

  26. Empty water from the kitchen sink and replace with fresh very warm water (only 2 or 3 inches this time) and place bread dough and tin into water...... 

.........and cover sink with a cloth. Make sure the cloth does not touch the dough.


27. Turn oven onto 230 degrees Celsius.

  28. Allow dough to rise right up in the baking tin (usually 30 mins or certainly maybe much longer).  This is happening whilst your oven is heating up.


29. Very gently remove baking tin with dough from the warm water and gently place into your very hot oven.

  30. Bake for the first 10 mins on very hot (230 degree Celsius) and then drop the heat to 190 degree Celsius continue to bake for a further 20 mins.


31. Have a cooling tray ready to place the cooked bread on to cool. (Let it cool in the tin)




  32. Please allow hot bread to cool for 1 hour before cutting as the cooling process is vital for the bread to finish forming its flavour and texture.

33. Turn out of the tin.........

......... carefully peel off the butter wrapper paper and ENJOY!


This is my very favourite recipe for a good basic white loaf. I modified Rhonda Hetzel's recipe that you will find HERE.


If you have not baked bread using a dough hook before, I'm pretty sure you will quickly love this method and be able to do it with your eyes closed in no time flat.


Take care folks and stay nice.

Mr HM

6 comments:

  1. You make yours almost the same as I do mine (1 tsp bread improver), except I don't use cornflour or sugar. Can you please tell me what the cornflour does to the mix? Mine all goes in to the bread maker - set and forget. Sometimes I remove it before the bake and cook in a hot oven. At that stage a light sprinkling with water helps the crust crisp.
    Well done - looks like really tasty bread.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi eb. Cornflour is a bread improver in its own right. I find it helps give a nicer crust too.

      Delete
  2. Looks delicious. I don't have a bread hook, but I'm sure for those who do, this post will be very informative. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. .....I know so many folk with Kenwood Chef's sitting idle in the cupboard. Just hoping this post might encourage them to use them.

      Delete
  3. Really need to get back to my bread making. Yummy!! I can just smell it now.
    --krystal (nova scotia)

    ReplyDelete
  4. You just can't beat a fresh baked loaf!

    ReplyDelete

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